The ‘jungle’ was destroyed and many were left with nowhere to go.

Migrants move tents from a makeshift camp in a street near Stalingrad metro station in Paris, France, October 28, 2016. The number of migrants sleeping rough on the streets of Paris has risen by at least a third since the start of the week, with some of the newcomers coming from the northern France camp of Calais that started being dismantled on Monday, officials said.   REUTERS/Charles Platiau   - RTX2QUU3
Migrants move tents from a makeshift camp in a street near Stalingrad metro station in Paris, France, October 28, 2016. The number of migrants sleeping rough on the streets of Paris has risen by at least a third since the start of the week, with some of the newcomers coming from the northern France camp of Calais that started being dismantled on Monday, officials said. REUTERS/Charles Platiau

Thousands of refugees were removed from the so-called ‘jungle’ in Calais, in the final demolition phase, but many were not resettled.

This Wednesday, the French Ministry of Interior announced that since Monday about 5,600 migrants had been taken to shelters throughout France or accepted in the UK.

Officials of the French government classified the operation as a success, but the fact is that many simply moved their tents from Calais to Paris.

According to Reuters, there are at least three times more refugees sleeping in the streets of the French capital since the beginning of the week.

No planning or management, these new clusters depend on charities to receive food and other essentials.

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