Air pollution already kills more than food shortage

africa-air-pollution-already-kills-more-than-food-shortage

Air pollution is already responsible for about 700,000 deaths in Africa every year. She became one of the leading causes of death on the continent, alongside malnutrition and poor water quality.

The data was released now in a study of the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) where the institution warns that “between 1990 and 2013 the total number of annual deaths from air pollution – pollution environmental particles, mainly caused by road transport , power generation and industry – increased 36% to more than 250 thousand people.

During the same period, deaths caused by pollution from household energy forms of pollutants, rose 18%, affecting more than 450,000 people. “

According advances the Guardian, the numbers are impressive, reaching ever levels considered until recently unthinkable: every year, the poor air quality in Africa kills longer contaminated water (542,000 deaths) and malnutrition (275,000 deaths). How then to explain these figures?

African countries are being confronted with air pollution caused by burning wood or the charcoal used for cooking.

But that’s not all. The enrichment and development of the continent is being accompanied pairwise by a mass electrification, increasing dependence on fossil fuels and an increase in road traffic.

Analyzing this last point we see that more and more cars on the continent, old models, much more polluting than newer versions. Only in 2007, Africa imported about 4.7 million used cars.

To counter this trend, there are already some organizations working on the ground. This is the case of Good Planet Foundation, working in Mali to significantly reduce air pollution in the area.

The institution is to be distributed by local communities biogas tanks to produce clean energy, replacing charcoal for cooking. This and other projects of this foundation to meet here.

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